The Trecena of Noj: 13 Days of Earth Wisdom & Ideas

Last Thursday, the Maya here in the western highlands of Guatemala celebrated Wajshakib Batz, 8 B’atz, which is the beginning of the new two hundred sixty day cycle. So, we are only just beginning. Again.

On Sunday, I interpreted a Mayan Fire Ceremony for a small group, alongside the spiritual guide, Thomas and he also brought his wife, Yolanda, for the first time ever to a ceremony at this particular location, after having worked there for 7 years.

It was a beautiful day-count ceremony, although the group was a bit reserved and tame. Blessings, gratitude, intention setting, letting go, calling in. The day was 11 Ix {Jaguar}, and afterward there were five personal readings with Thomas, which I also translated. Almost all of them teared up at some point during their readings, and all our hearts had been touched.

It felt like a poignant, full-circle morning for both Thomas and myself, as we had both been away from this center for many moons and were at long last coming back together in the role of guide and interpreter once again, with the intention of planting the seed for a prosperous and abundant season ahead.

So, just six days into the new cycle, we begin a new mini-cycle of 13 days. “Mayan weeks” are 13-day cycles called trecenas. From tomorrow, August 29, until September 10, 2018 we’ll be moving through the trecena ruled by the nahual known as Noj [pronounced “Noh”].

According to the Mayan Calendar Portal, “Caban, or No’j in K’iche’ Maya, represents intelligence, ideas, wisdom, knowledge, patience and memory.” This is the day sign of education, training and intelligence. Its spirit animals are the woodpecker and the gazelle. These next two weeks are a time for introspection, reflection and cultivation of knowledge and authentic wisdom, a time to give thanks to both Mother Earth’s and our own natural intelligence.

According to The Serpent and the Jaguar by Birgitte Rasine, on N’oj days, “the Maya ask for wisdom, for talent, and for the capacity to think positive, innovative or productive thoughts or ideas.  It is also a good day to ask for creativity in all of our endeavors and intelligence to address all of our challenges and resolve all of our issues.”

Mind over matter. Free your mind. Meditate.

These 13 days are about working with the innate intelligence mind, cultivating creativity and asking for clarity and understanding.

What is past belongs there; what is present is in your hands.  But it is only through your decisions in the present time that your future is defined: every action, every decision, every plan or project you undertake will have some impact on your life or perhaps those of others in the near- or long-term future. This is why the present is all-important; indeed, it is the only fleeting bit of time of which we have any active experience. – Birgitte Rasine

And this is why so many ancients and sages will tell you, live in the one moment, the ever-present, and think not of the past or future. For they are both already there, in that one eternal, flowing moment.

Here’s to intelligence, the power, presence and protection of nature, and cultivating wisdom with the intention of inner growth, from a place of mindfulness.

Where is your mind?

Time is but a Dream.

Row row row your boat, gently down the stream. Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily! Life is but a dream.

Are we in the same boat?

It is a gorgeous Sunday morning. I taught yoga overlooking the lake and then stretched a little by myself and then came to Moonfish and ordered coffee and eggs. I have to go to work soon, from ten-thirty til four o’clock, at a place around the corner and down the wooded path, a place called La Paz, which means peace.

This, and any given day of my life—though there are still times of stress and forgetfulness and overwhelm and confusion— is totally dreamlike compared to my life ten years ago… or fifteen. Or even six. Even last year! My nowadays and moments are spent more presently, more slowly, more deliberately. Usually. Still, I slip and fall and bleed and scab and get back up again the next morning. I feel my body ageing. And I’m not even forty yet. Old age and death are inevitable and life is short, it’s true.

My daughter is five already. Going on six. My grandmothers are in their nineties, my parents in their mid-sixties. Age, what is it good for? Birth, death, transformation.

I find it helpful to delineate the two types of time…. natural/galactic time and human-made/clock time. Natural time is the present moment, ever changing and evolving but always happening right now. Clock time is the 24 hour day, the sixty minute hour, the 7 day week, etc. Invented by people a long time ago.

Clock time is helpful for catching planes and trains, for scheduling things, for routines. It is helpful, to a point.

Natural time is helpful for meditation, for being present once we are involved in our previously scheduled [or not] activities, for living and experiencing our lives more fully, less incessant “are we there yet?” and “what’s next?”.

Spend some time in nature today contemplating natural time.

Breathe and consider that this is the breath of the planet, of the universe even.

Breathe and be one of the trillions of breathing beings upon the Earth.

Breathe and be alive.

Feel the sensation of your own heartbeat.

Feel the breath going in and out, the heart beating.

Row your boat merrily down the stream, and live the dream.

beautiful boat daylight foggy
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Life, Memories & Transformation

I used to live in the city. Now, I live in the woods.

I used to drive a car; now I walk.

I used to work in offices and institutions; now I work barefoot.

I used to worry; now I meditate.

I used to work too much. Now my work is my play.

I used to do yoga; now I live my yoga.

I used to speak English; now I speak Spanglish.

I used to have a fierce Chihuahua named Lucy. Now I have a different dog, a daughter, three cats, and a husband.

I used to be pink, and now I am green.

I used to be a square, but now I am a circle.

I used to work full time. Now I freelance.

I used to be a tourist, and now I am a traveler of both time and space.

I used to be a seed, but now I am a flower.

I used to be Friday night; now I am Sunday morning.

I used to be summer; now I am spring.

I used to be yang; now I am yin.

I used to be drama; now I live my dharma.

I used to be a believer; now I am a creative.

Inspiration from the Texas Yoga Retreat

The Texas Yoga Retreat happens annually in Austin each fall.

It is held at a beautiful ashram, a spiritual community centered around the practice of yoga. The site itself is an immensely inspiring place where Bhakti yoga is practiced– devotional chanting and meditation. Situated in the peaceful countryside on over 200 acres of rolling green hills in southwest Austin, the ashram has been home to spiritual devotees for over thirty years. The vibration of unconditional love is palpable from the moment you step onto the property.

This year’s 18th annual Texas Yoga Retreat will be held the weekend of October 26-28.

In the early 2000s, I was a marketing/advertising volunteer for the retreat and was fortunate to attend several times. I participated in inspiring workshops led by talented teachers across many lineages and styles of yoga who come from across the U.S. and also internationally. There are teachers who come each year and others who rotate and change from year to year.

One memorable aftereffect of a powerful Kundalini class I attended in 2006 was the sudden inspiration to reflect the inward transformation I was feeling with a drastic outward change—so I shaved my shoulder-length hair into a buzz-cut. I was coming into my own as a yogi and yoga teacher and despite a very negative reaction from my boss at the time, my family and friends loved my new style. This was a huge turning point for me, a time when I truly began to embody my authentic self, without fretting over what others’ would think or say.

I was blessed to attend the retreat last year as well. This time, I brought my Colombian husband along for the experience. I was impressed by the quality of each workshop, due to the teachers’ ability to inspire us with practical knowledge that took us deeper into our spiritual practice, both formal and “off-the-mat”. The Yoga Therapy Conference sponsored by the International Association of Yoga Therapists is open to everyone and runs concurrent with the regular retreat.

There are plenty of asana-based classes offered, for beginner, intermediate and advanced students alike, and one can also delve deeper into the less-commonly-taught limbs of yoga which are often overlooked in a standard class yoga studio or gym.

We learned about Dharana, the sixth of the eight limbs of yoga, in a Friday afternoon workshop with Texas Yoga Retreat co-founder, Charles MacInerney. He overflows with an abundance of wisdom, practical knowledge, humor and motivation. We practiced “eye yoga,” which involves mindful movements and stretches of the eyeballs; the very advanced pranayama technique known as yawning; and were inspired by his reading of the Wendell Berry poem, “The Future”:

For God’s sake, be done
with this jabber of “a better world.”
What blasphemy! No “futuristic”
twit or child thereof ever
in embodied light will see
a better world than this.
Do something! Go cut the weeds
beside the oblivious road. Pick up
the cans and bottles, old tires,
and dead predictions. No future
can be stuffed into this presence
except by being dead. The day is
clear and bright, and overhead
the sun not yet half finished
with his daily praise.

 

Dharana means single-pointed concentration. It is traditionally taught through seated meditation. Charles encouraged us to expand our practice of dharana into our yoga poses and life in general. He shared a “trick”—to slow down when we are doing the things we dislike. For example, washing dishes. If we have an aversion to washing dishes, we should very mindfully, slowly and carefully wash them, making a ritual out of it, doing a great job and being totally present as we complete the task.

He defined dharana as being in the flow, the place where learning happens, rather than in a place of boredom with our routine or pain/fear that arises when we strive for lofty goals that are too far beyond our current skill level.

We also attended a class on “Prayala Yoga” focusing on the hips and legs with Houston yoga teacher, Robert Boustany. I have attended several workshops with him over the years and am always blown away by his grounded yet charismatic demeanor, coupled with his vast experience and knowledge of the physical and energetic bodies.

In addition to doing some intense hip, quadriceps and hamstring stretches with the use of blocks and straps, we also got to balance our chakras. Robert explained that the first knot of energy that prevents kundalini from moving up the spine is at the 2nd chakra , which is located in the pelvic bowl around the level of the sacrum. The second knot is of space, at the heart center. The third knot is of prana, also known as life-force, and is located at the brow point, the third eye chakra. The class ended with an awe-inspiring meditation on the space behind the brow, the soft pallet of the mouth, the throat and finally the space within and behind the heart center.

The weekend serves up delicious meals of flavorful, healthy, vegetarian Indian food. The retreat attendees are friendly, open-minded yogis from Texas and beyond. All in all, this is a highly recommended weekend retreat for anyone looking to deepen their yogic studies and connect with a soulful, diverse community of spiritual practitioners.

To learn more or register for this year’s Texas Yoga Retreat from October 26-28, please visit TexasYoga.com.